Tax smart year-end gifts, save income tax

Prepared by Winton Smith J.D., Planned Giving Consultant

The new year is only 51 days away. Gifts to the South Carolina Waterfowl Association can help you save income tax. Our long-time expert on planned giving, Winton Smith, has outlined six planned giving year-end gift options to consider. As always, we appreciate all gifts and supporters of the South Carolina Waterfowl Association and its mission to enhance and perpetuate South Carolina’s wildlife heritage through education and waterfowl habitat conservation.

1. Gifts of Cash

Cash gifts are deductible up to 50% of your adjusted gross income provided you itemize your deductions on your tax return. The deduction may be carried forward for five years.

2. Gifts of Appreciated Securities, Real Estate or Business Interests

By making a gift of long term appreciated property, you can save income taxes twice. First, you save by receiving a charitable deduction for the current value of the gift. Second, you save by eliminating the payment of the increased capital gains tax on the property’s increased value. These gifts are deductible up to 30% of your adjusted gross income, a deduction which may be carried forward for five years.

3. Charitable IRA Rollover Gift

The Charitable IRA Rollover Gift is available in 2016 and future years. This gift provides a way for donor’s age 70 and ½ or older to transfer up to $100,000 tax-free from an IRA directly to the South Carolina Waterfowl Association. This gift also provides a way to avoid the required minimum distribution by directing that it be paid to the SCWA.

4. Gifts that Provide Increased Income for Life

A life income gift such as a Charitable Remainder Trust or a Charitable Gift Annuity allows you to give to the South Carolina Waterfowl Association and also provides life income for you and another if you wish. These gifts frequently increase your income; save income tax, capital gains tax and estate tax; and also benefit our organization.

5. Gifts of Home or Farm

You can give your residence or farm to the South Carolina Waterfowl Association now and keep the use of the property during your own and another’s lifetime. You receive a current income tax deduction for your future gift to the South Carolina Waterfowl Association and save income tax now.

6. Income Tax Charitable Deduction

Please consult with your tax advisor to make sure that you receive the maximum tax benefits from your charitable gifts. The rules are complicated. We would welcome the chance to visit with you and your advisors to insure that you receive the tax benefits from your gifts to the South Carolina Waterfowl Association and your other charitable interests.

If you are considering a planned gift, we encourage you to contact the SCWA Executive Director, David Wielicki. He is available by phone and e-mail.
E-mail David: scwadw@ftc-i.net
Call David: 803-600-8979

P.S. A website dedicated to planned giving information and the SCWA is under construction. The website will offer planned giving calculators, FAQ, information on how your gift is used, and more. Follow our blog, join our e-mail list, or connect with us on social media platforms (scroll down a bit more) to see any future updates on the website’s progress!

Social Media Platforms

Facebook – Search @SouthCarolinaWaterfowl
Instagram – Search @SouthCarolinaWaterfowl
Twitter – Search @SC_Waterfowl
Pinterest – Search @SCWaterfowl

Nature’s story-time, a walk through the woods with Generations Group

CAMP LEOPOLD – The bus that arrived the morning of October 14 carried a group of young men who would remain engaged and inquisitive the entire day.

On scholarship from VLS Recovery, boys from Generations Group walked into Chace Lodge eager to absorb every single bit of knowledge the SCWA education staff would provide.

Generations Group is a non-profit based in the Upstate of South Carolina. Its mission “is to prevent sexual abuse by helping neglected and/or at-risk adolescent and pre-adolescent males overcome abusive behaviors.” The young men attending Camp Leopold live at the Generations facility full-time; many will soon be leaving the facility and returning home.

For security reasons, no photos that identified the young men were taken. Instead, the SCWA Communications Director, accompanied the group during their walk through the woods. The goal was to document some of the things a typical group could expect to see during a session at Camp Leopold.  Here are the highlights:

TREES

Obviously. It was a walk through the woods after all. What was interesting wasn’t the fact that trees were around but the perspective the instructors offered when it came to looking at the trees. Unless you live in a place like NYC, you’re probably going to see a tree at some point during the day. What you might not see is the way that tree is interacting with other plants – how it’s fighting for sunlight, providing food for turkeys, or acting as a territory marker for deer. You probably don’t notice the tilt of the branches or the shape of the leaves but those things are important when you’re trying to identify the tree species, or the tree’s health. When you’re surrounded by trees  (eg: a walk in the woods) it’s much more difficult to not notice the unique characteristics of each plant.

SIGNS OF ANIMAL LIFE

It’s possible you’ll see a paw print from your neighbor’s dog on the sidewalk if the ground is wet from rain but when you take a walk through the woods with a Camp Leopold instructor you start to notice signs of animal life. You start to wonder how recently the raccoon walked across the path or why the bird chose that exact tree to build their nest.

MOSS, FUNGI, ETC.

While taking a walk through the woods, things that might be considered gross or annoying on a city sidewalk suddenly tell part of an ongoing story. The growth of fungi on a fallen tree trunk tells you if the soil is remaining moist from recent storms. Mushrooms or plants that require roots in the ground provide nutrition for invasive species such as wild hogs. Spanish Moss, which isn’t actually a moss but a flowering plant, defies what you learned in school about plants needing soil to grow.

A walk through the woods at Camp Leopold is nature’s version of story-time. Instructors and nature are co-storytellers. You might not sit crisscross-applesauce on a multi-colored carpet, but you’re still drawn in by the characters, the plot, and the pictures. No two stories (walks) are ever the same.

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The SCWA Camp Leopold team greatly appreciates the scholarship offering by VLS Recovery. We look forward to Generations Group’s next trip to Camp.

For more information about Camp Leopold, visit www.WildlifeEdCenter.org and like the Camp Leopold Facebook Page, @CampLeopold.

 

 

Agri Drain donates water level control structure

Agri Drain donates water level control structure

Agri Drain Corporation, an agricultural equipment manufacturer based out of Adair, IA, recently donated an Inline Water Level Control Structure to the SCWA habitat management team.

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Agri Drain sales executive, Jeff Harris (left) and SCWA habitat manager, Jonathan Patrick pause for a photo after discussing how the SCWA plans to use the donated inline water level control structure.

The structure will be placed in Bullington Pond, the body of water closest to the Wildlife Education Center buildings. Campers frequently fish off the Bullington Pond dock, staff members train their retrievers from the banks of the pond, and parents and chaperones often comment on the peaceful and serene view from the porch of Chace Lodge.

Habitat Manager Jonathan Patrick said “the structure will help the habitat management team retain water for irrigation, flooding and help provide better fishing quality for our summer campers. Being able to efficiently control the water will allow us to save money, water, and electricity.”

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The view of Bullington Pond from the deck of Chace Lodge.

It is unlikely the structure will be installed before duck season this year but Patrick said the installation will happen prior to the 2017 summer camp season.

With the help of volunteers, donors, and members, the SCWA habitat management team has accomplished the following in the past 30 years:

  • Distributed and installed 22,300 wood duck nest boxes resulting in the production of more than 950,000 wood ducks.
  • Provided wetland management assistance to 600 landowners resulting in the creation and enhancement of thousands of acres of managed wetlands.
  • Produced more than 155,000 songbirds.
  • Successfully released 840,000 mallards.
  • Added 75 to 100 thousand waterfowl to South Carolina’s waterfowl population on an annual basis. 

Thank you Agri Drain for supporting future conservation efforts by the South Carolina Waterfowl Association.

Upcoming Events – October 2016

Who doesn’t love a good event? Good food, good music, good cause. Sounds, well, good right?

We list all of our fundraising events on our main website, but each month we plan to provide details on all upcoming SCWA events on our blog.

October events include

  • Saturday – October 21 – Lancaster Conservation Dinner & Auction*
    • This event was originally scheduled for October 8 but was moved due to hurricane Matthew.
    • Doors open at 6 p.m.
    • Location: Bradley Arts Building
    • Details and Tickets: Lancaster Chapter webpage
  • Thursday – October 20 – Laurens Conservation Dinner & Auction*
  • Saturday – October 22 – First Annual Duck Fest
  • Wednesday – October 26 – Lexington Conservation Dinner & Auction*
    • Doors open at 6 p.m.
    • Location: Town of Lexington Municipal Center
    • Details and Tickets: Contact Chapter Chairman, Jarett Harrelson
      • 803-546-0851, jarett.m.harrelson@enterprisecarsales.com
  • Saturday – October 29 – Low Country Conservation Dinner & Auction*
  • Deer Hunt – TBA – Camp Woodie
    • Camp Woodie will host a deer hunt during October 2016. If you think you should be receiving information about this event, contact Katie Childress, campwoodie@scwa.org.

Camp Leopold has sessions scheduled throughout October but has some available dates for booking. To bring your students to our 410-acre outdoor classroom, e-mail camp director, Joe Gonzalez: joe@scwa.org.

*Funds raised from conservation dinners & auctions support South Carolina Waterfowl Association’s education programs, Camp Woodie and Camp Leopold.

We hope to see you soon!

SCWA staff members attend camp for adults (aka the 2016 Fall Camp Conference)

Recently, our two camp directors attended the 2016 Southeastern Fall Camp Conference in Greenville, SC. The conference was hosted by the American Camp Association (ACA) which works as a network of camp professionals to “enrich the lives of children, youth and adults through the camp experience.” (See ACA Mission and Vision)

Joe Gonzalez and Keller Kissam, Jr. of SCWA spent three days at the Embassy Suites Greenville Golf Resort and Conference Center meeting other camp professionals, discussing resolutions to industry challenges, and absorbing ideas for future projects. “It was the good kind of information overload,” Camp Leopold Director, Joe Gonzalez, said about the trip. “I’ve already got one person who said they would send some information over about a project idea.”

Camp Woodie, SCWA’s summer education program, has earned accreditation from the ACA. Camp Leopold, SCWA’s school-year program, is working on earning ACA accreditation now.

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Keller Kissam, Jr. SCWA’s Camp Woodie Director, and Joe Gonzalez, SCWA’s Camp Leopold Director, pause to snap a selfie during the 2016 Southeastern Fall Camp Conference hosted the American Camp Association in Greenville.

Camp for adults in the industry looks a bit different than camp sessions at the Wildlife Education Center (WEC). Here’s how “camp” for adults compares to SCWA education programs.

LOCATION

ACA: If a conference is hosted in a city that is new to you it can be an adventure to travel and explore a new place. If the conference is hosted in the same place year after year, you will probably have some favorite spots. It can also be fun to introduce newcomers to the best places in town.

WEC: Visiting a 410-acre education center means you probably won’t see every inch of the property but you’re sure to have some new adventures. From canoeing to capture the flag, science to shotgun practice, and time under the stars, there is always something fun to do at the WEC.

ACTIVITIES

ACA: Education professionals gather in ballrooms or meeting rooms for seminars, demonstrations, keynote presentations, and discussions. Some sessions will plan team building exercises. Almost all gatherings happen indoors.

WEC: Kids receive instruction about a skill or activity and then practice what they learned in hands-on situations. Campers go canoeing, walk through wetlands, complete an archery course, or try their hand at shooting. Groups gather around campfires for evening snacks, songs, and stories. Almost all gatherings happen outdoors.

FOOD

ACA: Many conferences will provide a few meals throughout the duration of the conference as a way to facilitate networking. These meals are often boxed lunches or sandwich/salad buffets. Since many conferences are held in a city, you will sometimes see conference attendees grabbing a bite to eat or a drink together in the evening.

WEC: A typical day at Camp Woodie or Camp Leopold will include fresh fruit, juice, plenty of water, vegetables, plenty of protein (our jumbo chicken tenders are a big hit!), maybe a sweet treat, and some type of grain/carbohydrate (french toast sticks are well liked for breakfast…yum!) Students who attend Camp Leopold often want to take the kitchen staff back to their school with them.

 

 

LEARNING

ACA: Seminars, discussion panels, and networking events might not sound like fun when compared to summer camp or school field trips but for camp professionals they can be a chance to expand knowledge, inspire creativity, and explore challenging ideas. Professionals often return from conferences energized and renewed.

WEC: Campers are always learning something while at the WEC. Even during transition times, kids are learning about nature and life. Campers often have the opportunity to obtain special certifications, learn from industry experts, and master a new skill.

FRIENDSHIP

ACA: Conferences are all about discussion, education, and networking. Camp professionals will have numerous chances to speak with experts in the field, meet staff members from other camps, and exchange ideas and business cards. You might just meet a future employee, consultant, business partner, or boss.

WEC: Summer campers often leave having made friends from other towns and will become pen-pals until the next summer. Some even grow up to be college roommates! School-year campers leave knowing more about their classmates’ interests. They might bond over their new love for the outdoors or decide to work together on their next science project.

While the settings, meals, and clientele differ, the mission of a conference and the mission of a camp for kids is pretty similar. Both experiences help people grow, learn new things, and meet new people. SCWA team members enjoyed their time in Greenville, S.C. but are happy to be back at the WEC and continue working toward the next camp program achievement.

Read about Camp Woodie and Camp Leopold’s recent attendance records in our blog post from August titled: Camp Woodie and Camp Leopold setting new records.

Camp Woodie youth hunts offer fellowship and family fun

Camp Woodie youth hunts offer fellowship and family fun

WILDLIFE EDUCATION CENTER – If the size of a smile indicates success, then the first two youth hunts of the season surpassed expectations. Approximately 30 senior campers from the summer 2016 camp season visited Camp Woodie on September 10 or 17 for youth dove hunts.

Almost as many counselors as campers returned as mentors for the event. Campers were able to show their parents the skills they learned or refined during their week at Camp Woodie. “I think every youth took home a bird. Everyone seemed to have a good time,” Assistant Camp Director Katie Childress said when asked about the success of the event.

If you go dove hunting again and want a new recipe to try, our friend The Sporting Chef, has a great spicy dove on tomato option. We haven’t tested it but the description sounds delicious – “This appetizer preparation is spicy, cool, cheesy and juicy – all in the same bite.”

Here are some of our favorite pictures from the hunts. Search “Camp Woodie” on Facebook to see the complete photo gallery.

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Senior campers are always invited back for a youth dove or duck hunt. For details on the youth hunt program, e-mail campwoodie@scwa.org.

More information about Camp Woodie, SCWA’s summer, youth education program, is available at www.WildlifeEdCenter.org.

In the kitchen – Spicy Dove on Tomato

In the kitchen – Spicy Dove on Tomato

We recently hosted the first youth hunts of the season (more on that in our September 20 blog post). Since the events were dove hunts, we asked our friend The Sporting Chef about sharing one of his recipes with you.

Scott, The Sporting Chef, describes his spicy dove on tomato dish as “spicy, cool, cheesy and juicy – all in the same bite,” and from the recipe it certainly sounds that way. The recipe serves four, has six ingredients, and we estimate at least half an hour of cook time (especially for less experienced cooks) once you begin.

See and print the full recipe here. If you give it a go, be sure to tag Camp Woodie’s Instagram account (@campwoodie) in a post.

Good luck in the kitchen!

P.S. See more SCWA recipe choices from The Sporting Chef here.